Disneyland Bans Children Under 14 Alone, Disney World, California Adventure, too

Photo of California Adventure

Disneyland, Disney World, and California Adventure will ban lone kids under 14 beginning on March 23, 2013.

Previously children of various ages were allowed in the Disney parks unaccompanied by an older person.

The policy will not be enforced based on government-issued identification cards, which youngsters under 14 may not have.  Instead, Disney employees will approach those who look young, and if the children are under 14, they will contact a parent or guardian, according to the Orange County Register.

The new policy for all Disney parks will be the same for Disneyland, Walt Disney World, California Adventure, which previously admitted solo children of varying ages.  

Children visiting any Disney park must be accompanied by someone 14 or older.

A Disneyland spokesperson said that the new rule followed a survey of guests and various child welfare organizations, and that age 14 is the minimum age recommended by the American Red Cross. 

The Orange County Register reported on March 15 that the Disneyland spokesperson said that the policy was not triggered by any specific issue with unaccompanied children in a park.

However, the policy comes within a week of the drowning death of a 13-year-old swimmer in a pool at Disney’s Pop Century Resort on the grounds of Walt Disney World, according to the U.K. Daily Mail and other news organizations.

The boy from Springfield, Missouri, was swimming at about 9:00 pm, March 10, in the hotel pool with a group of children including his little brother and a cousin. The tragedy was discussed on Dizboards. com beginning on Sunday, March 10 and the later drowning death on Tuesday, March 12 was reported by the Orlando Sentinel.  

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Author: AstroGremlin

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11 thoughts on “Disneyland Bans Children Under 14 Alone, Disney World, California Adventure, too”

  1. View the photo In this Saturday, June 22, 2013 photo, Johnny Depp attends the world premiere of “The Lone Ranger” at Disney California Adventure in Anaheim, Calif. The Golden Globe-winning actor plays iconic Native American, Tonto, in the upcoming Disney reboot opening July 3. He said his children, Lily-Rose, 14, and Jack, 11, can’t wait to see it. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP) on Yahoo! News. Find more photos in our photo galleries.
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  2. I agree that the 7 yr old policy is WAY too young. (I have commented to my husband several times how absurd a policy that seemed.) We have 9 year olds that are very responsible, excellent students, and frequent travelers, but no way would we let them go solo to a Disney park. That said, I also don’t think an 11 year old with a cell phone exploring Tom Sawyer Island solo (while grandma browses a gift shop in the same park) should be categorized as letting Disney babysit either. I didn’t realize until I started seeing these postings that the new policy meant that tweens 10-13 wouldn’t be given some freedom within the parks…seriously, do we all have to go down Summit Plummet?? Disney has done such a wonderful job of understanding children and families and finding ways for them to (happily and safely) vacation together, that I’m finding it hard to believe that they’d be so short sighted when it comes to enforcing this policy. Could the intent simply be that the under 14 set just aren’t allowed to get on a bus or through the admissions gate alone? That would seem very reasonable to me.
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  3. The policy will not be enforced based on government-issued identification cards, which youngsters under 14 may not have. Instead, Disney employees will approach those who look young, and if the children are under 14, they will contact a parent or guardian, according to the Orange County Register .
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  4. The concept for Disneyland began when Walt Disney was visiting Griffith Park in Los Angeles with his daughters Diane and Sharon. While watching them ride the merry-go-round , he came up with the idea of a place where adults and their children could go and have fun together, though his dream lay dormant for many years.
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  5. I’m not sure if that’s a good idea or not, on one hand it’s a great idea so that kids aren’t on their own and may be lost or causing trouble. But on the bother hand, isn’t Disney supposed to be for kids to enjoy themselves without their parents anyway.
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    1. I agree, children under 14 should be accompanied by an adult – since it’s a huge responsibility for a young teen to watch a child in a crowded public place. And any place that kids swim needs to be constantly supervised by a lifeguard (someone trained to administer CPR and first aid). Every year (even here in Canada) there are tragic (and preventable) drowning deaths in public and private pools. It’s worth the money to pay a lifeguard!

      Perry the Platypus knows better: http://www.squidoo.com/perry-the-platypus-aka-agent-p

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