WordPress Works for the beWildered

WordPress is not perfect, although capable of perfection. And it’s worth the time of the neophyte to get a working, nice looking page, with many options for future expansion and improvements.

Blogging has never been easier, or more challenging, thanks to WordPress.   “Consumer” pre-packaged sites are easy, but kind of difficult to customize.  WordPress offers a DIY approach that is simple enough to get your blog up and running, but allows powerful modification if you are willing to do a little homework on features like Plug-ins and settings.

For the new blogger, WordPress is doable.  You can 1) avoid the coding and make a great site using what is at hand, or 2) learn a little coding and get fussy with the exact layout.  WordPress gives you the power to lay out a nice looking site, and start blogging content.

Rocket Science?  Or Prairie Dog persistence?

Rocket science has one of two outcomes:  1) the rocket flies, 2) the rocket blows up.  Last time we checked, no half blown-up rockets were completing their missions.  But web sites are not rocket science; they are prairie dog towns.  You can make a site work, and then make a site better, and then grind away toward a more optimized outcome, even when perfection isn’t achieved.   A prairie dog, if it keeps digging away, can make a very long tunnel.  The trick is to get started.

The Perfect is the Enemy of the Good

WordPress is not perfect, although capable of perfection.  And it’s worth the time of the neophyte to get a working, nice looking page, with many options for future expansion and improvements.  WordPress works as long as you do.  And some of its key features — tags, connectivity, comments, multiple users– are geared for massive monetization.  WordPress is as good as you are, and maybe just a little bit better!  That’s my conclusion anyway, after working with it for two days.